Nairobi Woman Recounts How Having A Darker Complexion Made Her Primary School Life Miserable

 KEY POINTS

  • A middle aged Kenyan woman has opened up on her traumatizing childhood especially while in primary school.
  • While some have greatest primary school memories, all that the mother of one can recall is the bullying and ugly names that she was forced to endure
  • The feeling of rejection troubled her so much that it affected her relationship with her siblings who were of light complexion

A middle aged Kenyan woman has opened up on her traumatizing childhood especially while in primary school.

Christine, an interior designer who is in her thirties spoke to YouTuber Lynne Ngungi about her challenging life.

While some have greatest primary school memories, all that the mother of one can recall is the bullying and ugly names that she was forced to endure in her school days because of being darker.

“I was very bullied in primary school by the boys because of my complexion, I was called blacky broly, I don’t know what meant. We were learning about breeds of goats and cows at that time and there was one called boer. It was a dark black goat, so in my head, that’s what I knew all these years they were calling me,” she said.

The worst moment was during the parade when she would be called upon by the teacher to read a Bible verse or  lead the school in prayer.

“You could just hear the boys saying blacky broly,” an emotional Christine recalled.

Soon enough the whole school would refer to her by the nickname. Her friends who had faced similar encounters stood up and defended themselves once the boys attempted to bully them with such nicknames. But Christine never defended herself and it became a daily routine.

“It affected me a lot, maybe more than I cared to admit. I never stood up for myself the first time it happened  so that is how it became  a thing that the other boys became comfortable calling me  and it went so far as dining hall,” she said.

Christine would get to the dining hall and find her plate empty. Her bullies would have swept clean her plate leaving her with nothing to eat.

“I got to a point where I stopped going to the dining hall at all and it was a boarding school where we never carried our own foodstuffs. I used to eat these black fruits, they look like zambarau, they were wild fruits, they were behind our classrooms,” the mother of one said.

The bullying affected her so much to a point that she drank shampoo and even started to wet her beddings.

“I started to pee in my bed. I was very affected mentally by the whole thing and I remember it is raining during the day you are in class and you know your mattress is outside and you don’t want to get embarrassed and ask for permission to go and [remove it]. My life was miserable. I wasn’t eating and I was peeing in my bed, so I don’t have the best memories of my primary school,” Christine narrated.

The feeling of rejection troubled her so much that it affected her relationship with her siblings who were of light complexion.

“When in class six, my mom had my sister. My sister looked nothing like me. My mom is [has a light] complexion and my sister’s dad was the same so now things got more difficult at home during the holidays,” She said.

Two years later, her brother who was more lighter was born. 

“I just felt out of place at home I felt out of place in school,” she said.

She decided to go to her  cousins’ place who had a complexion like hers and she felt at home. Here is her whole story.

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